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CHAPTER 3 MARKSMANSHIP KNOWN-DISTANCE TARGETS, DISMOUNTED SECTION L Preparatory training II. Courses to be fired. HI. Conduct of range practice. IV. Known-distance targets and ranges; range precautions V. Small-bore practice SECTION I PREPARATORY TRAINING • 45. INSTRUCTION AND PRACTICE.-a Relative value.-(1) Pistol firing is a purely mechanical operation that any man who is physically and mentally fit to be a soldier can learn to do well if properly instructed. The methods of instruction must be the sane as are used in teaching any mechanical opera- tion. The soldier must be taught the various steps in their proper order and must be carefully watched and corrected whenever he makes a mistake. (2) Good shooting is more the result of careful instruction than of mere practice. Unless properly instructed, men in- stinctively do the wrong thing in firing the pistol. They in- stinctively jerk the trigger which is the cause of flinching. Hence, mere practice fixes the instinctive bad habits. (3) If, however, a man has been first thoroughly instructed in the mechanism of correct shooting and is then carefully and properly coached when he begins firing, correct shooting habits rapidly become fixed. (4) The ultimate object of the training is to develop the ability to fire one or more accurate shots quickly, but training must begin with carefully coached slow fire to attain accuracy and be followed by practice that will gradually shorten the time without sacrificing the accuracy. b. Methods of instruction.-(1) Pistol instruction is divided into two phases, preparatory instruction and range firing.

M1911 Manual - Page 32

M1911 Manual - Page 32

 


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